DBNPH
@MattCatinella1 : @Davidburtka I’m not in this picture but i do work for @RinglingBros. We loved having you here pic.twitter.com/fXVLd1S9Nt

@MattCatinella1 :  I’m not in this picture but i do work for . We loved having you here

David Burtka & NPH at Atlas Social Club


David Burtka & NPH share clothes Aug 2014

 

David Burtka & NPH share clothes Aug 2014

 

captainswan-asyouwish:

Challenge Ice-cepted for Neil Patrick Harris.

X

Challenge Ice-cepted! #ALSIceBucketChallenge x

Rashidra Scott ‏:Thank you for playing with us at @BeautifulOnBay tonight, @DavidBurtka &@ActuallyNPH

Neil Patrick Harris and partner David Burtka take their two kids, Gideon Burtka-Harris and Harper Burtka-Harris, to the Central Park Zoo in New York City. Harris has denied rumors from earlier this week that claimed he and Burtka had ended their engagement after over ten years together

Neil Patrick Harris and David Burtka put on a show of unity after split rumours as they take twins Harper and Gideon to the zoo

 - Earlier this week Neil confronted rumours that suggested the couple of 10 years had split.

The How I Met Your Mother star donned a tank top with a location-appropriate design on the front showing the New York City skyline, a pair of dark denim jeans, a hat from the ‘Yellowstone Club’, and gray trainers.

His partner David went quirky with his attire, wearing a T-shirt with a screaming primate graphic, black trousers, and a black fedora.Little Harper matched her dad’s animal-themed ensemble with her own, but one that included a photo of a tiger instead.



 

unternrad: David Burtka at NPH last performance as Hedwig!

x x


David Burtka & Gideon Burtka-Harris (NYC 30 june 2014)

David Burtka & Gideon Burtka-Harris (NYC 30 june 2014)

nph-burtka:

(x) David Burtka With Gideon & Harper.

NPH LG art and the pixel spokeperson talk about how David Burtka helped inspire his passion for art.Through one of David’s jobs as a caterer, both he and Harris were able to learn about contemporary art and emerging artists, like Robert Longo and Jeff Koons.  NPH also talks about how these early experiences shaped his love of art.

nph-burtka
How to Be You by Neil Patrick HarrisGlamour Magazine, September 2014.
As his smash Broadway run in Hedwig and the Angry Inch comes to a close, Neil Patrick Harris shares the secrets of work, love, and living by your own rules.
His isn’t a career anyone could have planned. No one goes to their agent at age 16 and says: “OK, I’d like to begin by playing the adorable meganerd teen doctor Doogie Howser to massive public acclaim. Then, after being fatally defined by the role, I think I’ll portray a washed-up actor in the bro-tastic Harold & Kumar films, thereby kind of resurrecting my career and exhib­iting refreshing self-awareness, and afterward I’ll land a gig as a charmingly heartless lothario on a dominating sitcom right when everyone says that dominating sitcoms are dead—ha! (That would be Barney Stinson on How I Met Your Mother, in case you weren’t among the 12.9 million viewers who caught the series finale last spring.) And, you know, in the middle of that, I’d like to be one of the first in-his-prime stars to publicly come out of the closet, declare my love for my boyfriend (now fiance), and have adorable twins via a surrogate. Then I think I’ll once again escape the grips of post-sitcom career death by winning aTony Award for possibly the most demanding title role in contemporary Broadway—Hedwig and the Angry Inch—and finish my year with a mesmerizing turn in one of the most anticipated movies of recent history, Gone Girl. Oh yeah, and then there’s this little thing called my memoir, Neil Patrick Harris: Choose Your Own Autobiography, which will come out in…let’s say…October 2014? Mr. Agent, let’s draw up the paper­work. Can we call it the ‘How to Succeed in Show Business Without Ever Compromising Yourself or What You Care About’ plan?”
Any agent, of course, would say you were crazy—but Harris, 41, would argue that success requires allowing yourself to really, truly evolve. The man’s full of great, life-shifting advice. Such as:
1. Accept yourself and others will too. When I was younger I was totally afraid of failure. I was under a pretty unique microscope— I mean, I was acting through puberty! I was overly sensitive to the notion that people were watching me, so I spent a lot of time mak­ing sure that I had an acceptable outward image. If I could give advice to the person I was, I’d encourage him not to spend so many minutes concerned about other people and what they’re thinking. Despite what you imagine, you can’t control any of that anyway.
2. Be with the person you’re attracted to. In high school all my friends were sleeping with girls, and it just seemed like that’s what one did. So therefore that’s what I did, but it left me feeling unset­tled, as if I had somehow done it wrong. That’s not a good feeling. But now I think it’s easier to avoid that fate. Today, it’s cool to see a happy lesbian couple who are high school juniors. Better that than have those two girls marry people they’re not attracted to, have three kids, and then come out when they’re 50.
3. Also, dance more. I’ve always been really uncomfortable danc­ing in social situations, at a nightclub. But I wish I’d danced more when I was younger and been free to look awkward. If you’re having fun, it really doesn’t matter what people are thinking about you.
4. Ask yourself, What are you waiting for? About four years ago the mother of my better half [David Burtka] passed away suddenly from leukemia. In 21 days it went from “What is this weird thing on my leg?” to “We have to make a decision to stop the intubation.” She would have been an extraordinary grandma. [David and I] were both sitting post-trauma and thought about the immediacy of life. Anything can happen in a month, a year, or 20 years. We decided we couldn’t just wait until everything was in the right position before choosing to have a baby. Because we were two guys, we had to go through a lot of initial hoops and hurdles—I mean, believe me, we tried the natural way [laughs], and it just wouldn’t take. So we said, “Let’s try it,” and it worked out perfect the first time: Both fertilized eggs took. One of his, one of mine. Boy. Girl. Both healthy. It was more than we could have ever asked for.
5. Don’t worry about being perfect. As a parent, I’m much more heady and introspective, and David’s hearty, emotional. It makes for a fantastic balance, but we never planned it that way. Whether the parents are a guy and a girl, a guy and a guy, or two women, I think you need both of those elements. Thankfully, David’s very nurturing—he’s a chef, a cuddler, and a hugger. I’m much more the “let me fix something” camp counselor type. You have to manage your expectations. Another example: When you have kids, every­thing is like quicksand. At first it’s like, my kids sleep for 12 hours. Every night. It’s the best. Then suddenly they’re up every five hours. As a parent, you can’t get too set in anything—that’s something I’m still trying to learn.
Even in other parts of my life, expectations can bring me down. If I thought it would take me 20 minutes to get somewhere but instead it takes 40, I’m in a crappy mood. If I expect to come home and have David awake with friends over, like we had discussed, but I get home and he’s sleeping and our friends aren’t there, I’m in a bad mood. Leave expectations at the door, and whatever ends up happening will happen.
6. Try things that make you uncomfort­able. Playing Hedwig—a super-feminine, German punk rock musician—was not in my wheelhouse. But it’s important to challenge yourself. When you’re in your teens and you fail, it feels defining. It alters the way you think about yourself for the rest of your life. But when you’re older, it just doesn’t matter. Plus, it’s good to keep a little flop sweat going.
7. Wear crazy heels for a month. I wasn’t a very sexual being at a young age. I went through puberty much later than my classmates, so I always glorified the masculine ideal. I thought that mascu­linity equated confidence, and I was struggling to feel confident.
Hedwig was a great active departure from that [mentality] because everything that I had known about confidence had to be thrown out the window. Now, all of a sudden, those mascu­line postures and inflections were tells that I wasn’t doing the job right. I had to be overtly feminine, and it felt totally weird. Initially, walking around in heels is a very challenging thing for a guy to do. But once you’ve done it six or seven times, it’s weirdly empowering. I had to move my hips and legs in a way that guys don’t get to do so boldly—it was fun! It’s actually kind of righted my pendulum a little. If you’re not an actor, it might be hard to recommend being super ridiculous for a month. So why don’t you try a hip-hop class to see how that feels? (If you’re uncomfortable, see number three.)
8. When you see someone do something great, be inspired.
When you’re working with [director] David Fincher, the level of acting, process, and seriousness is ratcheted way up. Everyone in Gone Girl had to bring it every single take. We once did a scene 40 times, in succession, without stop­ping. [Fincher’s style] can be maddening to some. But to me, watching him hone and refine—not just on the actor level but even simply rotating a plant in the background of a shot just a little bit—was awe-inspiring. Sometimes I’d just watch him sit in a chair and be completely gobsmacked and think, I can’t believe I’m on a David Fincher set
…9. If you want relationships to last, live by “for better or worse.”
Honeymoon phases end. They just do. We’re animals, and animals aren’t inclined to copulate with just each other for the rest of their lives. So here’s a challenge: How do you keep redefining your rela­tionship? I think you have to find new elements that turn you on, and not only sexually. Having kids was one of those great moments for me. Watching David become another level of person, master­ing this other domain, made me look at him with a whole other set of apprecia­tive eyes. That sort of made me re-fall in love with him.
That’s another important thing to realize. Everyone falls out of love with everything. You fall out of love with your house. You fall out of love with your job. You just have to figure out ways to keep [the love] alive. That can mean taking a trip together. But it’s just as valid to say: “Let’s take a minute. I’ll be in this room; you’ll be in that room.”
10. Let people be who they are. When Harper was one or two years old and barely talking, she would put on Disney princess outfits (which she still does, by the way). Everyone would coo and take pic­tures. Gideon felt left out, so he put on a dress too. We all cooed and aww-ed and there was no weirdness. But after about four minutes, you could see it: He just didn’t like it. It was too girly, too frilly, and he just took it off, like, Nah, this is not my thing. Lately he’s been wearing construction vests and hard hats, and he asks con­struction people if he can work with them. He couldn’t be happier.
11. Don’t let anyone else decide when you can be happy. Well, except sometimes. I go to therapy, and my therapist encour­ages individuality over codependency. You’re allowed to be in a good place even if your partner might not be. But it’s hard when that other person is someone you love. It’s true that when David is happy, I’m in a really good mood. And when David is unhappy and things aren’t great, I tend to be pretty cranky.
12. Know that you may never find work-life balance. When I leave Hedwig [on August 17], I’m looking forward to getting in the headspace of my kids. I won’t have to check out because I have that thing that I gotta go do at that time. I actually miss waking up with only five hours of sleep and knowing that I might be a little haggard but that’s OK. Like Barney Stinson, I think we should live life as if it’s a great adventure. And if the chapters aren’t good, make up your own ending.
Read the full article →

Some of it is very good, other things are just strange, and confusing about what he really mean (belive)………..

nph-burtka

How to Be You by Neil Patrick Harris
Glamour Magazine, September 2014.

As his smash Broadway run in Hedwig and the Angry Inch comes to a close, Neil Patrick Harris shares the secrets of work, love, and living by your own rules.

His isn’t a career anyone could have planned. No one goes to their agent at age 16 and says: “OK, I’d like to begin by playing the adorable meganerd teen doctor Doogie Howser to massive public acclaim. Then, after being fatally defined by the role, I think I’ll portray a washed-up actor in the bro-tastic Harold & Kumar films, thereby kind of resurrecting my career and exhib­iting refreshing self-awareness, and afterward I’ll land a gig as a charmingly heartless lothario on a dominating sitcom right when everyone says that dominating sitcoms are dead—ha! (That would be Barney Stinson on How I Met Your Mother, in case you weren’t among the 12.9 million viewers who caught the series finale last spring.) And, you know, in the middle of that, I’d like to be one of the first in-his-prime stars to publicly come out of the closet, declare my love for my boyfriend (now fiance), and have adorable twins via a surrogate. Then I think I’ll once again escape the grips of post-sitcom career death by winning aTony Award for possibly the most demanding title role in contemporary Broadway—Hedwig and the Angry Inch—and finish my year with a mesmerizing turn in one of the most anticipated movies of recent history, Gone Girl. Oh yeah, and then there’s this little thing called my memoir, Neil Patrick Harris: Choose Your Own Autobiography, which will come out in…let’s say…October 2014? Mr. Agent, let’s draw up the paper­work. Can we call it the ‘How to Succeed in Show Business Without Ever Compromising Yourself or What You Care About’ plan?”

Any agent, of course, would say you were crazy—but Harris, 41, would argue that success requires allowing yourself to really, truly evolve. The man’s full of great, life-shifting advice. Such as:

1. Accept yourself and others will too. When I was younger I was totally afraid of failure. I was under a pretty unique microscope— I mean, I was acting through puberty! I was overly sensitive to the notion that people were watching me, so I spent a lot of time mak­ing sure that I had an acceptable outward image. If I could give advice to the person I was, I’d encourage him not to spend so many minutes concerned about other people and what they’re thinking. Despite what you imagine, you can’t control any of that anyway.

2. Be with the person you’re attracted to. In high school all my friends were sleeping with girls, and it just seemed like that’s what one did. So therefore that’s what I did, but it left me feeling unset­tled, as if I had somehow done it wrong. That’s not a good feeling. But now I think it’s easier to avoid that fate. Today, it’s cool to see a happy lesbian couple who are high school juniors. Better that than have those two girls marry people they’re not attracted to, have three kids, and then come out when they’re 50.

3. Also, dance more. I’ve always been really uncomfortable danc­ing in social situations, at a nightclub. But I wish I’d danced more when I was younger and been free to look awkward. If you’re having fun, it really doesn’t matter what people are thinking about you.

4. Ask yourself, What are you waiting for? About four years ago the mother of my better half [David Burtka] passed away suddenly from leukemia. In 21 days it went from “What is this weird thing on my leg?” to “We have to make a decision to stop the intubation.” She would have been an extraordinary grandma. [David and I] were both sitting post-trauma and thought about the immediacy of life. Anything can happen in a month, a year, or 20 years. We decided we couldn’t just wait until everything was in the right position before choosing to have a baby. Because we were two guys, we had to go through a lot of initial hoops and hurdles—I mean, believe me, we tried the natural way [laughs], and it just wouldn’t take. So we said, “Let’s try it,” and it worked out perfect the first time: Both fertilized eggs took. One of his, one of mine. Boy. Girl. Both healthy. It was more than we could have ever asked for.

5. Don’t worry about being perfect. As a parent, I’m much more heady and introspective, and David’s hearty, emotional. It makes for a fantastic balance, but we never planned it that way. Whether the parents are a guy and a girl, a guy and a guy, or two women, I think you need both of those elements. Thankfully, David’s very nurturing—he’s a chef, a cuddler, and a hugger. I’m much more the “let me fix something” camp counselor type. You have to manage your expectations. Another example: When you have kids, every­thing is like quicksand. At first it’s like, my kids sleep for 12 hours. Every night. It’s the best. Then suddenly they’re up every five hours. As a parent, you can’t get too set in anything—that’s something I’m still trying to learn.

Even in other parts of my life, expectations can bring me down. If I thought it would take me 20 minutes to get somewhere but instead it takes 40, I’m in a crappy mood. If I expect to come home and have David awake with friends over, like we had discussed, but I get home and he’s sleeping and our friends aren’t there, I’m in a bad mood. Leave expectations at the door, and whatever ends up happening will happen.

6. Try things that make you uncomfort­able. Playing Hedwig—a super-feminine, German punk rock musician—was not in my wheelhouse. But it’s important to challenge yourself. When you’re in your teens and you fail, it feels defining. It alters the way you think about yourself for the rest of your life. But when you’re older, it just doesn’t matter. Plus, it’s good to keep a little flop sweat going.

7. Wear crazy heels for a month. I wasn’t a very sexual being at a young age. I went through puberty much later than my classmates, so I always glorified the masculine ideal. I thought that mascu­linity equated confidence, and I was struggling to feel confident.

Hedwig was a great active departure from that [mentality] because everything that I had known about confidence had to be thrown out the window. Now, all of a sudden, those mascu­line postures and inflections were tells that I wasn’t doing the job right. I had to be overtly feminine, and it felt totally weird. Initially, walking around in heels is a very challenging thing for a guy to do. But once you’ve done it six or seven times, it’s weirdly empowering. I had to move my hips and legs in a way that guys don’t get to do so boldly—it was fun! It’s actually kind of righted my pendulum a little. If you’re not an actor, it might be hard to recommend being super ridiculous for a month. So why don’t you try a hip-hop class to see how that feels? (If you’re uncomfortable, see number three.)

8. When you see someone do something great, be inspired.

When you’re working with [director] David Fincher, the level of acting, process, and seriousness is ratcheted way up. Everyone in Gone Girl had to bring it every single take. We once did a scene 40 times, in succession, without stop­ping. [Fincher’s style] can be maddening to some. But to me, watching him hone and refine—not just on the actor level but even simply rotating a plant in the background of a shot just a little bit—was awe-inspiring. Sometimes I’d just watch him sit in a chair and be completely gobsmacked and think, I can’t believe I’m on a David Fincher set


9. If you want relationships to last, live by “for better or worse.”

Honeymoon phases end. They just do. We’re animals, and animals aren’t inclined to copulate with just each other for the rest of their lives. So here’s a challenge: How do you keep redefining your rela­tionship? I think you have to find new elements that turn you on, and not only sexually. Having kids was one of those great moments for me. Watching David become another level of person, master­ing this other domain, made me look at him with a whole other set of apprecia­tive eyes. That sort of made me re-fall in love with him.

That’s another important thing to realize. Everyone falls out of love with everything. You fall out of love with your house. You fall out of love with your job. You just have to figure out ways to keep [the love] alive. That can mean taking a trip together. But it’s just as valid to say: “Let’s take a minute. I’ll be in this room; you’ll be in that room.”

10. Let people be who they are. When Harper was one or two years old and barely talking, she would put on Disney princess outfits (which she still does, by the way). Everyone would coo and take pic­tures. Gideon felt left out, so he put on a dress too. We all cooed and aww-ed and there was no weirdness. But after about four minutes, you could see it: He just didn’t like it. It was too girly, too frilly, and he just took it off, like, Nah, this is not my thing. Lately he’s been wearing construction vests and hard hats, and he asks con­struction people if he can work with them. He couldn’t be happier.

11. Don’t let anyone else decide when you can be happy. Well, except sometimes. I go to therapy, and my therapist encour­ages individuality over codependency. You’re allowed to be in a good place even if your partner might not be. But it’s hard when that other person is someone you love. It’s true that when David is happy, I’m in a really good mood. And when David is unhappy and things aren’t great, I tend to be pretty cranky.

12. Know that you may never find work-life balance. When I leave Hedwig [on August 17], I’m looking forward to getting in the headspace of my kids. I won’t have to check out because I have that thing that I gotta go do at that time. I actually miss waking up with only five hours of sleep and knowing that I might be a little haggard but that’s OK. Like Barney Stinson, I think we should live life as if it’s a great adventure. And if the chapters aren’t good, make up your own ending.

Read the full article →

Some of it is very good, other things are just strange, and confusing about what he really mean (belive)………..

David Burtka will be in the Dance-Off  Movie.  Is coming out 10/7/14 on Video On Demand.

Trailer

"Dance-Off will be available on 10/7/14 for purchase at Amazon Instant Video, iTunes, Blockbuster On Demand, Sony Playstation, Xbox, YouTube and other locations. Cable/Satellite Video On Demand - including DirecTV and Dish Network”